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Saturday, October 05, 2019

You can kill a person; you can not kill a Gandhi

By on Saturday, October 05, 2019

Why is, if some foreigner comes to India, he is brought to Rajghat, not to Birla Bhawan where Mahatma Gandhi had passed his last days and was killed by a maniac man?
The answer is that in modern India, Rajghat is a such symbol of peace that has no face of past while Birla Bhawan forces us to gaze with the history struggle of freedom fighting which have the Gandhi’s killing. This is a question today why Gandhi had been killed?
Gandhi was killed because the communal forces for the religious purpose afraid of him.  The forces of making radical statue of Bharat Mata, the divisive forces on the basis of communal identification of nationalism concept -- all remained always bothered. Gandhi, by disobeying to the rituals of religion, searched the meaning... and some in such manner that the religious approach could be followed and that meaning could be followed too... and that politics could stand to what could make new country and new society.
Gandhi’s religious approach was phobia free; his hindutva, remained always undoubtful. He always saved symbol Rama and Gita from the clutch of communal forces and gave him new and humanitarian meaning; his god never rely on untouchability, but it penalised those forces as a face of earthquack, who relied on it. Ahead of this regious approach, the living forces on the name religion and  the rioting communal forces on the name of Nation -- all got themselves frustrated.  Godse, a man, was a symbol of frustration, who had killed a religious Gandhi, not secular Nehru nor communal Zinnah.
But in all respect Gandhi never die – it is rooted verse which is told in the support of every thought while in recent we look at we find that the world today learn much more from Gandhi. How much he might have been conventional, he has been proved much of post-modern. He constructs vowel of faith against arguementism in our century. The issues of our time seem conceived in the womb of his concept. Whether it is the issue of humanright, or of the cultural plurality or of invironment – all look like tied with the cotton string created from Gandhi’s wheel.
Gandhi writes an ideal sentence against the bottomless consumption: this earth can fulfill the need of all, but it is small prey before a greedy fellow. His concept of Gram Swarajya against the globlisation seems an option of lonely political-economic instead of own limits. It is a twinkling of humanity infront the dazzling light of market where we can identify our gentle values.